Visudyne (verteporfin for injection) is a light-activated drug used in photodynamic therapy. Visudyne offers an anatomical treatment that occludes mature vessels that may be expressing less or no VEGF. It works to effect vaso-occlusion of the arteriolarized neovessels that may be the cause of persistent activity.*

*Persistent activity is defined herein as exudative manifestations that continue despite anti-VEGF treatments


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Indications and Usage


Visudyne (verteporfin for injection) is indicated for the treatment of predominantly classic subfoveal choroidal neovascularization due to age-related macular degeneration, pathologic myopia, or presumed ocular histoplasmosis.

Important Safety Information


Visudyne is contraindicated for patients with porphyria or known hypersensitivity to any component of Visudyne.

Infusion-related transient back pain occurred with Visudyne only. Verteporfin infusion induces temporary photosensitivity; patients should avoid exposure of skin and eyes to direct sunlight or bright indoor light for 5 days. To prevent extravasation, avoid fragile hand veins in favor of larger antecubital veins.

Severe vision decrease (≥4 lines) was reported within 7 days in 1% to 5% of patients. Partial recovery occurs in some patients. Do not re-treat these patients until vision completely recovers to pretreatment levels and potential benefits and risks of subsequent treatment are carefully weighed.

The most frequently reported adverse events (10% to 30% incidence) were injection site reactions (including extravasation and rashes), blurred vision, decreased visual acuity, and visual field defects.

Please see complete Prescribing Information for Visudyne (192.8 KB, PDF) (verteporfin for injection).

Visudyne (verteporfin for injection) : Additional information


Visudyne is a trademark of Novartis AG under license.

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2. Cousins et al, unpublished, presented at Royal Hawaiian Eye, 2014. 3. Slakter JS. What to do when anti-VEGF therapy “fails.” Retinal Physician website. http://www.retinalphysician.com/articleviewer.aspx?articleid=104427. Published June 2010. Accessed March 17, 2014.
4. Cho M, Barbazetto IA, Freund KB. Refractory neovascular age-related macular degeneration secondary to polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy.Am J Ophthalmol. 2009;148(1):70-78.
5. Schmidt-Erfurth U, Kriechbaum K, Oldag A. Three-Dimensional Angiography of Classic and Occult Lesion Types in Choroidal Neovascularization.IOVS 2007;48(4):1751-1760.
6. Cousins SW. Controversies in Long-term AMD Management. Retinal Physician Website. http://www.retinalphysician.com/articleviewer.aspx?articleID=103843. Published January 2010. Accessed March 20, 2014.

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