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OcuCoat Viscoelastic

ocucoat

Formulated from a 2% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose solution, OcuCoat Viscoelastic is ideal for high-volume, small-incision cataract surgery. It can be used for a variety of applications, including lens inserter lubrication.

  • Excellent coating properties help protect endothelial cells
  • The enhanced clarity of OcuCoat enables an unobstructed view of the surgical field throughout capsulorhexis and phaco
  • Low molecular weight allows for rapid removal with minimal risk of elevated intraocular pressure
OcuCoat Order Information: 

 Size    

 Part Number

 1.0mL x 6

 CC065S

OcuCoat Viscoelastic - Brief Statement

Indications
OcuCoat Viscoelastic is indicated for use as an ophthalmic surgical aid in anterior segment surgical procedures, including cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. OcuCoat maintains a deep chamber during anterior segment surgery and thereby allows for more efficient manipulation with less trauma to the corneal endothelium and other ocular tissues. The viscoelasticity of OcuCoathelps the vitreous face to be pushed back, thus preventing formation of a postoperative flat chamber.

Contraindications
At present, there are no known contraindications to the use of OcuCoat when used as recommended.

Precautions
This product contains dry natural rubber. Precautions are limited to those normally associated with the ophthalmic surgical procedure being performed. There may be transient increased intraocular pressure following surgery because of pre-existing glaucoma or due to the surgery itself. For these reasons, the following precautions should be considered: OcuCoat should be removed from the anterior chamber at the end of surgery. If the post-operative intraocular pressure increases above expected values, appropriate therapy should be administered.

Adverse Events
A transient rise in intraocular pressure postoperatively has been reported in some cases. Rarely, postoperative inflammatory reactions (iritis, hypopyon), as well as incidents of corneal edema and corneal decompensation, have been reported with viscoelastic agents. Their relationship to OcuCoat has not been established.